(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Superintendents of the Yellowstone National Parks Monthly Reports, October 1929"

,0-23 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

Yellowstone... national park 



File No. 
C 




o 



MONTHLY REPORT FOR 
OCTOBER 
19 2 9 



k3 

\0 



IMPORTANT 

This filo constitutes a part of the official records of the 
National Park Service and should not be separated or papers 
withdrawn without express authority of the official in charge. 

All Files should be returned promptly to the File Room. 

Officials and employees will be held responsible for failure 
to observe these rules, which are necessary to protect the integ- 
rity of the official records. 

STEPHEN T. MATHER, 

g. ■. oovftaNuxvr 1 ftiKTijfo orrioi •■» 6-7410 DiTCCtor, 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 
YELLOWSTONE PARK. WYO. 



■ OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



Kcvembor o, 1929 



The Director, 

Rational Park Service, 
IBsshington, D* C. 

Bear Mr* Directors 

The following is my report of tfoe activities of the national Pak 
Service in Yellowstone National Part: during the month of October, 1929* 

000 - General 

leather conditions were ideal during the month of October for 
the continuation of our work, and it was not until the last few days of 
the month that w« e perlenoed any had weather to speak of* Splendid 
progress was made 011 roadside cleanup scad construction «ork* The roads 
were in sjtsji condition and visitors entered the park until the end of the 
Month* She road over Sylv*ji Pass m& closed, due to construction «ork, 
hut the loop road, with the exception of Dtatraven Pass, was open to travel. 

*°0 - administration 

HO - s tatus of work 

Director ~lbright moved with his family to SfesMagten on Oct 

oher 1* Several days were spent in clearing up the work which he l&ft 
prior to his departure* 

The minutes of the park conference required a great deal of 
tine of the Assistant to the Superintendent and the two stenographers* 

On the 50th of the month Clerk Esther ?£artin, who has been acting 
as timekeeper, loft the park to return to Vfeshlngtoa, and it will be 
neooasary for us to find someone to fill the position* 

Chief Clerk B* a* Handle? reported for duty on October 30* 

The superintendent was absent from the park from October 5 to 20 
Inclusive* During his absence he visited Hm Eaticnal Park, Bryee National 
Park, the North Elm of the Grand Canyon, iipe Springs rational 



( 



f\0\f\3TV\\ 3HT ^O TH3MTRAq30 
30IVA33 XflAq JAMOITAH 

><FIAS JAUOITAH 3HOT8WOJJ3Y 
.OYW .^HA^ 3M0T8W0JJ3Y 



rH3aM3TMIfl3<1U8 3H 



espx .8 ******* 






tm 



~ , ■ % , 



mA ls9bt »wr aaocJrtaoc vat***! 
& im* 3*w #1 faBtt t #t€W TJ» 1ft ftftiiftftftltjieo ft*!;? 

•/CyjMor Art too feara hv; c #%» iftrf* ffiaos <*Ij 

TUf?S .90 fc0*3 ft 

v^rt^s- to «< n fftftX «M J^rf 

- 

ML**** - 

.AflOi Jft» CB^irfft, .V ©: teirfia 

•f-flfc L - . - c 

**X*I«>i afti «4 scMq 

la c-s* as te e«fl? 



■ . ' . ■ 



Vtlfi^ i ... 3fttl 

vr ftftsftftftft (ii 

**SftI 



Timpanogos national Lfcmumont, Dinosaur Bational Monument, Fossil Oyoad 
Bational Mumuiut and Jewel Cave Bational llonament* Hie family moved 
to Denver on October 5« 

Assistant Superintendent Daum was on leave of absence during 
the 3a st three da^s of the month and assistant to the Superintendent 
Joffe was noting Superintendent* 

Barly on the morning; of October 30 9 the superintendent left for 
LaGrande, Oregon, to make an Inspection trip of the proposed Horn 
Bational Park. 

120 - Park Inspections By 
121 - Superintendent 

The superintendent was absent from the park the greater part of 
the month* He returned on October 21 and spent several days in the office 
going through the accumulation of mall, writing report s, etc* On the 2 r >th 
in company with Assistant Superintendent Daum, the superintendent inspect- 
ed the contract work, nearing completion, on the East ihtranoe road, and 
also the 1323 contract work under construction* On October 27 he visited 
the Imperial Geyser, while in eruption, as well as the construction and re- 
cone traction work beine done by the Yellows tone Park Hotel Company at Old 
iaithful, Lake and Canyon* 

123 - national Park Service Officers 

Chief Landscape architect T* C. Vint remained in the park after 
the Superintendents* Conference and left on October 6* 

Fire Control Sxpsrt J* D. Coffman stayed in the park until 
October 7, when he left via Cody* 

I25 - Other Governmental Officers 

Ur* Fred Foster, special fish eulturist for the Bational Park 
Service and Bureau of Pisheriee, who has been in the park since July 10, 
looking after fish cultural work, left on October 4 *o* Salt ***• City, but 
returned on the 14th for a few days, leaving via Gardiner for Salt Lake 
City, where he is going to make his headquarters for the winter* 

Hr* H* B* Hommon, Sanitary Engineer in charge of xublic Health 
Service work in the national parks, remained after the Superintendents* 
Conference and left via >*'est Yellowstone on October 4* He, an well as Chief 
Landscape Architect Vint, made inspection trips to the Grand Teton Bational 
Park* 

I27 - Other Agencies 

Ur* W* M* Rash, assigned to special investigation work on the 
park wild life, spent the month on investigations and on office and laboratory 

-2- 



H 






..rvj..!/ ^..*«a J l; 



, tes mam ' -»-^ 



•(«& MV& 4a.i£ *{* 



• [* 






■ 



JUNHU 



J / >*s 






•to, 



M<* T*< 



'* 



to tftaq «if ? n I 



i o : . 









fcaf i 









^^^^^^^^^H 



J - tCv., 

m&aml 
•tfUfl 



•W •« 



Dr* 3* T* ^lltt, of the Geophysical Laboratory of the Carnegie 
Institute, who has beam in the park since Jane 6, left Tin Gardiner on 
October 3* 

Dr* C* H* Fenner, of the Oeophysioal Laboratory of the Carnegie 
Institute, who has been encased in special investigation work in the Old 
iaithful and Harris areas, left via Gardiner on October 30. a sptcial 
orew, working under Or* i?'enner, was engaged in ditiging test holes at the 
Upper Oeyser Basin and later at Korria* The discing at Old faithful 
reaohed a depth of 406 feet, when loose sand was struck, The temperature 
at the bottom was 350 decrees Fahrenheit or 180 degrees Centigrade* The 
steam pressure was 57 pounds. On October 14 the orew under Dr. Fenner 
moved to ftorris, but before very much progress could be made, it was neces- 
sary to discontinue the work, due to shortage of funds* 

140 - Labor Situation 

Labor conditions remained unchanged* 
150 - h fouipresnt and .supplies 

Bo Items of major equipment were received this month* 
170 - Plans, Maps and Surveys 



▲ survey orew was organized and sent down to St* ^nthony, Idaho 
to assist Mr* C. a* Bock, Vice /resident of the Dayton Liorgan Engineering 
Co* for irrigation studies in connection with the Boundary Commission work. 
This crew was later used on our construction work* 

180 - Circulars, Bulletins, eto* 

▲ copy of October Eature notes is attached* 

200 - Maintenance, Improverasnts and Hew Construction 

Light maintenance was discontinued on October 15* This work con- 
sisted of scarifying sad processing the light oil mat between Mammoth ami 
Harris* Heavy maintenance consisted of completion of the ditching over the 
Canyon-Lake- rhumb section* Replacement of the culvert across the drainage 
from Crater Kills with vitrified pipe was made as contemplated last spring* 
The corrugated Iron pipe (Keystone brand) was installed in June, 1928, and 
at the time of the replacement the bottom section of the pipe had bean 
entirely eaten out by the acids in the water* Traffic uas not interrupted 
by this work although pipe was placed beneath a 30« fill* 



usual operations for spring snow removal were made during the 
month which oonsi steel in placing THT and supplies at advantageous points 
at Sylvan iass, Dunraven iass and lit* •mshburn* 



ajrf ttto ,s: 



. 






— , > -■ 



|£Jb C '-** ***** ' 



■ iMii aid - «M 

■ ' ' 
»<rc*oG ^o x 



:•: J 



■ 






j*B fl 



••». *l~ %rt fialt 






tot «r *» •« 



utfaafl *JM 6ii f -"' « r 






220 - improvements 

SKSfSP&S. £^2Rt ^ carpenter crew spent practically the entire 
month on new construction of buildings* 



Engineering j3epartl*ant£ Work of this department in addition to 
assisting In the irrigation studies for the Boundary Commission consisted 
in the usual maintenance, reconstruction, and roadside cleanup supervision. 

San^teUoaj^jyfaasntt The work of this department \ms cut to a 
minimum thTs rnonthT ~AH~projects were discontinued throughout the park 
except at Mammoth. 

^la.c^rJ : oal_I>ep^rteienJti The usual iQaintenance and operation of 
the electricTand telephone~system was oarried on throughout the month* the 
force being out to a minimum. 

]^hanj[cal_l^p^toenta Considerable difficulty was encountered in 
Maintaining the cons trucTi^^t rucks and Oiui.Ment in ope rati m» The -ower 
shoTsl was partially overhauled and major repairs were made to several of 
the trucks* 

2 3° * Set? Pons tract ion 

^XfJ&M&QB. Z £ I S/i 3 SfLR£°®?L. ^l^SPi. Considerable delay was 
occasioned on this project due to the sickness of our power shovel operators 
necessitating the discontinuance of the two-shift system. In addition it 
was necessary to borrow slide rook to make the fill alon*: the lower mile and 
a half of the project instead of dirt called for in the plans furnished by 
the B.jf*IU The project was practically completed at the end of the month 
although considerable snow was encountered at the last which made it im- 
possible to finish the project as we would like to have finished it* 

AS^—^J^S^ i.^^SSl 1 ^k ^S four mile contract is practically 
complete except for the final cl oouup* On the Belli of the month as inspect- 
ion was made and the road was found to bo in fine shape* This road will 
be a very strikingly scenic road when it is finally opened to travel and will 
add considerably to the attraction of that entrance* On this year's contract 
construction is practically oomplete bet. sen Sylvan lake and Sylvan Pass, 
and through Sylvan Bass* utork was also started at the lower end and appro- 
ximately one half mile of that project has been completed with the remainder 
of the project having been cleared and made ready for excavation* 

ttewnoth - £orrjhB^?^^side £lennup_i The work of widening the road- 
side cleanup between~9wen Lake flat and Sorris was completed during the 
month and approximately two miles of o leaning and grubbing have boon done 
between the 13 and 15 mile posts In preparation for next year's construction. 



«f '!0 I CO VMI OO i£i 



e 



4 



ai tort* lift i 

l*i*mm at •btan ant* rxiflgrx ic^«a bote Trv» *r a.*. 






- 

oTtoc 

■ 

-<*, :,tw -i«£ijr i*i**Aua «• wood 

.if:- v^ 



1»5 it. 



Horris -Jfe31so&Jta^da« £l»» ;l £ l Clsanup of ths ibbon Canyon 
section was eomyTstad and" work waV^aarried on from the north end of this 
•action to 313c inrk* This section of ths wort: is practically complete ox* 
eopt for burning sons of the debris. As long as ths weather permits the 
cleanup sill continue toward Xorrls* 

££kJ£ L 3&£! i &2A- m — 2M. J&1&2QJ&^^£ QS&SflP About two 
miles fronfthe oTd iOuntjTin Hotel north have~been completed on this pro- 
ject which is beint done with donation funds* 

JftBurt *tjftnoe ^oa^eHe^CJ-e^nup^ Cub Creefc ^cti^oni This raw .loot 
was oampleTed all except the lower mile** leather oonii tions made it im- 
possible to make the progress anticipated. This section of road is in one 
of the snow belts and always receives the first and l*st snows - and more 
than any section of the 3ast Btatramco road* 



Madison JjmoM onj-_ .est i' llow^taue ita^^ro^astt, BiTnraide jJeotipn 
This projeot~is practically oaranlote except for The pow«r shovel worlc which 
consists of borrowing 2000 cubic fset of raatnrial and making the approach 
fills* 

^srtension and J^i^ovement of^^terj ^pjfcamt^ Ths water system at 
Horris was laid out. Ssran thousand five hundred feet of throe inch pipe 
laid ami the back fill 50$ completed by the end of the month* 



rioad i, j&uBg J^ldin^a aJtJUfltei The mess house and bunk house were 
practically completed during the month with the exception of chinking the 
logs and some as inside finishln; • 

£bsjKa\jat Sorr is^ ikufiz was discontinued at the end of the month* 
Practically alT of the rock work has been completed and all the exterior 
work on each wing* The foyer was not completed* 

2 4° - Improvement of Approaches to the Bwc'k 

There have baen no changes in the status of the approach roads 
within the past month* 

260 - landscape Work 

>3ons traction for the public utility operators was closed at the 
end of the aonth on their fall rrorJr* The %ot Satrsnce section was almost 
completed but the final cleanup did not yait/in shape and this work will be* 
finished ths first think; in the spring* Progress on the 3ylvan tffcss 
section was satisfactorily prosecuted during the month. The Gallatin pro- 
ject was oonpleted* nfark was begun on force account projects at Riverside 
and Old Faithful* and work was halted on Hamilton's Fishing Bridge store* 



af.-t *c 

■ 



I W- I 






■ ■ 






- ' . i •••■':«' 



tta m 



a Ik 






OUS 


01 


*80q 

• * 


| ■ - 




. 



la ■ 



■■■ st 



- 






■ (..■ * . .'** • i - 1 ■ * 












ot> 






400 - Flora, Sanaa and Satural Phenomena 

410 - Bangor, Baturallst and j-uide 3ery ice 

Banger activities consisted mostly of transporting winter 
rations and forage by pack horse to snowshoe oabinsj change of personnel 
froa snnner stations to winter stations; renewed activity on boundary 
patrols where there nay have been some chance of violations of the hunt- 
ing lave; repair work on cabins where bears hud done damagei and the 
assigning of three rangers in Thorofare District to study the drift of 
the elk from that country to their winter feeding grounds* 

Other activities consisted of the removal of all signs for pro- 
per storage, burning of brush at Old Kaithful , Lake, Thumb and Canyon, 
sad general cleanup of barns and stations for the winter* 

Assistant Chief Banger Trisehman finished his work in the 
Southern District and was replaced by Assistant Chief Banger Mclaughlin, 
who will carry on the %iork there for the winter. Assistant Chief Bearer 
Trisehman is now in charge of the Northern District* 



420 - lfaseua Service 

Old j&Jthf£l^Lius aum i_ The additional publications have been 
brought in from Old j&ithfal and checked in to Mr* Llndsley* The exhibits 
have been packed for the winter and the building closed* 

■u&noth Uwjkb^ The ljd ( \ season "bein over, the museum exhibits 
have been tr^isfTrred to the vrinter storeroom* All the animals have been 
moved and all birds on exhibit and in the preparation room with the ex- 
ception of those behind glass have been removed* a large specimen of 
trout weighing approximately fee* pounds was presented to the museum by 
Assistant Chief Banger Harry Trisehman during the past month* Due to the 
fact that the specimen was not skinned for mount ing It irook considerable 
time to prepare this* Sxperiaants have been carried out with 5$r* Foster 
in making casts of fish from plaster and one day was spent with him on 
this work* A quantity of vegetation has been secured and processed* This 
material is now ready for painting and Bill ultimately be placed in the 
groups for Horris* 

470 - Animals 

Weather conditions for wild life have been excellent and all 
reports as to forage conditions have been very rood* All gams drifting to 
their winter ranges has been slow and very few elk and deer have left the 



-6- 









- op 



B09 



i m 






Hm MtaM c* • -if/, ah, .; 


': ivr j lot 








JWnWtt.^. J flufti ?...*/» *x., ';iiw tJ 


1 VACUO • 


*m 






' 


rserfJ enttev ale 








ft bad aioo4 t 


10 - • J3'.ii:: 








ni rsoyui 


it ■£•*«■: 




t 




■ 





, 






IfciOl* 

-i «-r t «r 30C 

/ o£* «*dl rxott :tf*ew xfw 

#. & 10 istato at vrcn Oi MiMhf 






- 



-i *t ol no**. 



ft b03tt 



:» MMM ■ I 



I or! 






- :T0 ftOTld I 

\<& itiffto nw orlJ oJ be? a aw el /• . : . ' ilx o-o^c 

*rf oioor 

I V.* f 000 OSS *tt 



10 I . 



i > 

iioo 

•1 



— - 

•D'l ft* id 00>j- 






The following; table sheers the legitimate kills outside of the 
Yellows tone i 



a'horofaro Biverslde gal latin Cooke Pity Gardiner Crerloe 
Moose 11 sue 23 flfc 110 SUc 3 Deer 5 Deer 3 

lie 30 

Deer 17 

3heep 1 

Beer 10 



Jlk 110 


Ml 


3 


Deer 5 


Deer 80 


Deer 


1 


Beer 1 




Beer 


1 


(griealy) 



_<lk«, Weather conditions control all wild life and the elk did 
not start on their fall drift until very late this season* Numerous bands 
hare crossed the Thumb road at the 5 nils post, and si^ns of elk have been 
noted crossing the Borris road* Evidently these elk are drifting into the 
Blacktail District* Mr. Hush reports a few elk crossing the Pelican Flats 
earning out of the eastern boundary of the park. These elk Join the staaraer 
herd that rang* on Mirror Plateau and finally drift to Specimen Kidge and 
into the Tower Sails District. Reports hare been made of elk coning Ooiw 
the lauaar Biver, but very few in numbers. Thirty two head are feeding 
around the Game Preservation lianch drifting' back to Sepulchre 2£t. at day- 
break. There are about 175 feeding around Mam»th$ about 400 head hare 
been observed in the Blaofctail District, and 175 in the lower country off 
Buffalo Plateau going into the Hellroarlng District. Reports from hunting 
areas around the park consist of a total of /££ legitimate kills as com- 
pared with 114 at the close of October last year. 

^ntelpjoej numerous antelope hare been observed around the 
Buffalo Hanch and they may be observed daily around the Gardiner hey field. 
The ranger at the Game Preservation Ranch riding patrol reports 15 head 
outside of the park, 175 on the slopes of Mt. Jrerts and 150 on the old road 
to Gardiner. 

£*£!*£*-. Observations of a year aco were very unfavorable but 
general oonditlons this year appear to be much improved. Thirty four sheep 
were observed on Sit. Averts and their condition showed no sign of the 
couching that was very evident a year a ; o. All reports are that they are 
free from any noticeable disease. 

2?*FJL Oonditlons are very favorable this fall and deer may be 
seen daily around Mammoth. Approximately 4p may be seen at any time in 
the vicinity of Mammoth, 25 feed dally at the Game Preservation r&ncb, and 
60 were counted -lot* the old road from Mammoth to Gardiner. Along the 
Yellowstone to Eellroaring there are approximately 175 &ead **<* numerous 
deer are reported to be in Crevice basin* Tower Falls shares with its 
usual total of 25 and one will never fall to eee 35 to 40 along Blacktail 
Deer Creek. 

-7- 



odt la obtttsm %l -r.iitis^ <** a j 









■ 






otmad arenas i ...mca air' 



lap I ' ; --' aaa^BJat or 
"X via B&; 



•;. - 



qaodfi 






i aal* v 

wttt a<tt oj 

ad* 
a bosvu 

rnaerfo fltaatf 



. 



■ftajft 



. • 



■a r. 



Ktna 

. ■■ . 



; 



: 



' 


* 


«aaft t aXi 












-JJoa 





PI p 



aaalfa pp ami ppal 



. :mmrM lavwta t 

:o adi .jvpf. aaiavoa rr*r 

■■ T at aayieqa* a*a tef fc 
i-» ana Aaa JS la laJa* £aa*s 



Jtooset, There is a continued increase of moose according to 
report a. One has been observed at Mammoth on several occasions • * lont 
the highway from Golden uate to florris Junction noose bore been reported 
frequently. Thorofare reports 11 legitimate kills against a total of 17 
at the close of October, 1928. 

Bearsi Many reports have been nude of bears breaking into 
cabins and stations* One blade bear was killed at Cab Creek due to a 
badly lacerated Jaw. One vary dangerous black bear was killed at Lake, and 
one grisaly bear that was breaking into the Cabin Creek cabin was killed. 
At this writing moot of the bears have rtone into hibernation but a few may 
still be seem around the ~a?s houses that aro still in operation. Heports 
from hunting areas around the park show a total of 12 bears killed as con- 
pared with 13 at the close of October 31 last year. 



Buff JLoj_ ?he Lamar River herd have drifted down and way be seem 
alon the slopes of Specimen Ridge and the Lamar Flats. Herd conditions are 
excellent and forage conditions are above noraal. Weather conditions will 
determine the period of feeding hay from the Buffalo Ranch. 

£ z 2?%*2. r j£ ii l l ^ !i 1 J!L , 0ffic ° Order Ho. 2 (attached hereto) has been 
issued in regard"~to The" hunting of predatory animals. The coyotes killed 
daring the month totaled 22 as compared with 8l in October, 1928. Ho re- 
ports of other predatory animals are available. 

Buf falp_ Ranch and jother Ranch Cjjerjitipasj^ Activities at the 
Buffalo Ranch consisted of repair of maohinery7 hauling in the winter wood 
and care of the stock. The Ranoh forewarn at Slouch Creek has been plowing 
and harrowing at the Gardiner Ranch preparatory to conditioning the soil 
for spring plsmting. Fences and stacks have been repaired at the Game 
Preservation Ranch. 

480 - Natural Phenomena 
Mammoth iiot Springs 

as is generally supposed to be the case with the terraces and hot 
springs at Mammoth, there is a decrease of activity to be noted as accurring 
during the month of October. While Hound, Jupiter, Orange Spring Uound* 
and Vhite lephant Back Terrace have remained constant throughout the month. 
Blue Spring* has been characteristically variable. Minerva, Barrow Guarc, 
and Old Angel Terraces have decreased. In fact the latter ie entirely dead 
at this time. The small amount of activity present on the east side of Hew 
Angel Terrace has disappeared, but there is considerable activity to be 
found on its west side. This is, so far as known, new this month. The 

-8- 



ooo Xwiot are fLfianMK #« ftrrwc 



vwf moot aoiJoorfl tivxoV o* otfAO n «o*rt tovc^trf 

«0*oO 10 OOOJtO «K 

si ' siitf 010*4 10 f;la BOOtf JiO.^i 'iiT?.~ :r: r 

u 7o7a"~or.a oxu 

too ,sAI *a feoril:* wnn ' '«t *•**»• 

ytttoiri ao» 

V33 tr o*ni <mc ov/jC «*COO(f Bift lo 3 oof 

♦V # _^,; ; -o'-'C ei litis *■': >ooH *«? x' •« ■*# !■" •• «•»« ■ • a Jr 

* 



■ 



>-^ w *» ■ 



-•'i»\T '. ft * *« >fl 



•' &o 












; ijutfaooo ookIjw 



&> 









MUSe; , 



spring which broke out after the close of the eoason in the trail just 
east of the south end of Barrow uauge terrace has also increased, the water 
flowing southward having foroed quite a pool in the road at that point • All 
springs not mentioned hare remained constant throughout the month, insofar 
as observed* 

While the road over the formations is still passable for automo- 
biles, yet there is in places snow seven inches deep, and the next observa- 
tion will probably be made on foot, by means of webs* A flock of 450 
Bohemian Hearings were seen near the Devil's Kitchen, in which no bats could 
bs found* i'here were no recently killed birds to be found in utygiaa Caves* 

Report on Drilling Operations 

Through the efforts of Dr* A* I*. Bay, Director of the Geophysical 
Laboratory, supported by his collogues, Dr» B. f • Allen and Dr. C* n. Fenner 
and officials and friends of the H*P*3*, drilling on a scientific basis, 
for Information regarding the structure and composition of the material 
overlying the Upper Geyser Basin, was made possible* JSich valuable data was 
obtained substantiating theories already established relative to geyser 
phenomena* 

A nail portable rotary drill was used, powered by a Ford motor* 
«11 apparatus was housed in a drill shed, supported by heavy timbers, ten 
feet above ground level* A tripod built with forty foot poles, was erected 
over this structure to which the blocks and tackle used la pulling heavy 
drill rods were attached* 

actual drilling was started on September 14 with 7* L. Butler, a 
veteran driller. In charge of the work* An experienced crow of three 
drillers and their helpers, working three eight hour shifts a day, drilled 
408 feet In 28 days Jit this depth a temperature of l80*C was obtained and 
57 lbs* pressure ganged near the outlet of the well* 

A core, representing the material encountered averaging about one 
and one half inches in diameter was obtained* Preservation of the complete 
length of this core was Impossible due to either the extreme hardness or 
granular composition of strata encountered* 

The cutting was accomplished by the use of fragments of processed 
steel very hard and with high heat resisting qualities, set at Intervals in 
the contact surface of the drill bit* At times no more than four or five 
inches could be gained at one setting of the bit, and in some instances, 
driving of the rod had to be resorted to. 



. 



r rC£S HO 



•toriaatfe a* 



■ 

BSaai 



;Itff 
i anac" 



al 









■ 
WW3 f- : 



j afcfr » «Xa> 

aqpat fca» 

?Uaa ftdv «aisa£ **at»tt -w-f!'' arfi ^oi r ;it>vo 
iiaa ro^i tajafatfaa aaai«*4a 



...."■.. IT i. Pfcfc-'-'C* i 

•laval Lauor* aro*^ Jaal 



*ct»2'S*ixa ■ . <* *fc 
. ^ m r ***** * m 

taut! b*aar& tv****; ••<•■ 









■ 



MaVcot aatvza 



\&ik Ml 






an i*yi. 
. ttvai 



ttl alar* 



i^Hwrvii"- '■ i " :n •* 



TC # 









»v Xaara 
i tad osi 



The site chosen for these operations le 600 feet southwest of 
the Old Rdthfoft Hotel* There were no natural ef foots narred in any way, 
and the location was thought representative of the entire Upper Basin* 
4.11 that is left to mark the spot is a concrete block securing valve and 
casing* 

The original plans called for drilling at Sorris, where a type 
of activity, differing in many respects from the Upper and Lower basins 
is found* However the entire appropriation created for this project had 
been expended before more than a start could be made at No iris* 



Between Congress rool and Nuphar Lake the drill house was 
erected and machinery set up* Twenty feat of drill rod was driven, but 
no more could be done* Operations suspended October 19* 

500 - Use of Park Baollltios by the Public 

The travel records for the tourist season of 1929 were closed 
on September 25 and all travel since that time is included in the October 
report* Due to excellent weather conditions, the travel has shown an in- 
crease over the sane pariod for last year* 



Hr* 0* A, Hamilton had accomodations available at Ms Lake and 
Old Faithful stores for late visitors* The general store at Canyon was 
open most of the month and the general store at Ifammoth will continue in 
operation during the entire winter, in order to accomodate the employees 
at headquarters* 

Park Photographer J* 8* Bhynes cloeed up his shop at Hsmmoth 
left the park via Gardiner on October 14* 

510 - Increase or decrease of travel 

The following table shows all travel figures from September 25 
when the 1$29 season was closed* The Bast iitrance closed on September 20 
doe to the construction work on that road* 

OARS VISITORS 

Horth 496 * 1406 

375 1250 

• 

21 ■ 61 



Total 892 2719 

This is compared with I740 visitors traveling in 631 oars from Sept* 25 
to October 31 incl* last year* 



-10- 



» i^&t OOd «1 Bttottatmo Mitt ir'i aNft •** 

*r*Mr «ft u *»I •** &w 

el ic {« ertt :Aan C* n»X tl **tt 

.■■:*.£> 






ff J« •JEUMI 



■P ttMT 1 



• 



VUif Bl W'.'l 

**» tau **#•«• 

. >«0* 9<f bli OO CtC.r Off 



.v ■ -' ■• 



M © 






- 






*~ cw 



■ 
Hi i 



■«** 



tsiiU\ ! 



# T9*KJv *4^^^^^^^^H 



MftlO »»««* 



I 






|MJ 






. 



6> 






^0 - General Weather Conditions 
521 - In the Fark 



fine month was characterised by raild, pleasant weather. Mors 
than the average amount of sunshine was recorded and there were fewer days 
with precipitation than usual. Temperatures ware moderate and generally 
slightly above normal* The mean tor the month was 42.6© f 1.1 alove the 
normal* The highest temperature was 67 on the l6th, tho lowest 17 on 
the 23d. 

Precipitation totaled 1*27 inches, normal 1*^0 inches* Snow 
fsll on the last five days of the month but in small amounts, the total 
of which was 1*7 inches, 25$ of the average for October* There were 7 
days with 0*01 inch, or more, of precipitation* 

540 - Visitors 

iuraest and -arthur Nicholson, friends of the secretary to the 
President, 22r* Riehey, entered the park at Gardiner on October 17* '2hey 
covered most of the Grand Loop the following day and left via *est Yellow- 
stone* Due to the uncertainty of the weather, they did not remain lone? in 
the park* 

600 - irotaetion 



6l0 - Police Protection 

One case of violation of the hunting laws was broken* Mr* 
Adrian Swords was taken before the Commissioner t<xr killing a deer inside 
Yellowstone Park in the ^horofare District and was fined §50*00 and costs* 

63O - Special Incidents and accidents 

A Model 'J Ford belonging-; to the vrtaisport&tion Company 
driven by Paul jurnold with Mrs* Jfertha Hopkins as passenger, b< 
manageable ooming down the Bunsan Peak BoaA* To avoid a serious accident 
it was driven into the bank v/hare the Ford turned over injuring the 
occupants of the car* I2rs. Hopkins received a wrenched shoulder, while 
Mr. Arnold escaped with a few outs on his hands* Medical aid was f Ivan 
by Dr. Balers, the local physician. 

900 - Misoellansons 

Post Office 



The post office was on a winter basis and business was , ene rally 
light. Mr. 0*£.Hurallton reported that the beare broke into his general 
store at Fishing Bridge after it had been closed for the winter, and did a 
considerable damage, including soras damage to postal station and records* 



-11- 



- *c 



mi «7V? ■■*> Mai' , "■'■ . • • •• • ' • * »iv /fifiw ^' 

■..*» j&sm atft <■* at** & V 

wmM .•>--o— , A Lam , ^ ' •»- ■ ^- f - •••" '■ ^>-^ 
r«t «.- «w» IIodb ni tat iMmm «&■ 

ad* c 41 •«£* *» »* *** 

^|f| JO -"JiJiSlL-l/K 

DVOC 

4 

- 

,«,.foo fiai OO.0C& town *** fr i«M«6 *» ** *w* «sa#«M^T 

|gpii f ,,s-.- ..;.'. • «l ... •: feftftfMfi-' ' «•- --• **«•■•■ 

Mrfa fcriasaw « e»vJte«« «rf*rca . . . ■*» *o 

•XifZ «4L ** 



- 



He closed it up with shut tars and states it V7ill be impossible to ;et a 
fall survey of the situation until when it is opened up in the spring* 

Church 3ervices 



Rev. ebster H* Clements, from Livingston, Mont* held religious 
services in the Lodge Boom on Tuesday evening, October 1* 

Rev* Lewis D* amith, held episcopal services in the Lodge 1MB 
on Sunday Morning, October 20* 

Hosp ital end Medical Service* 

Dr. Jhiars, the resident physiclal reports 1S5 office colls and 
66 visits during the month* 

Very truly you is. 



t; Sap sr intend ent 



mi U 












mm. 

vtoc 






x* X»V 



miMtMNiMi 



i-159 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

STATUS OF PERSONNEL 

JELimsmom National Park for the Month of QQTG&M. I<fc9 



This This Month 

Month Last Year 



unber of employees beginning of month 79 Ti- 
mber of additions 3 4- 

Total 82 7A 

unber of separations .5 A 

urber of employees c1oh : r h . , ffi fQ~ 



mber of promotions during month. , . 



jgregate amount of annual leave taken 28I..I/? \f9.1J2.. 



jgregate amount of sick leave taken 39 *»- 

gate amount of leave without pay 33 5- 



or 



a3TATS 03TIMU 

HOIfl3Ti/1l 3HT lO TH3MT5RAS3a 

3DIVH3S Xf*A«R JAUOITAM 

J3HMOe«3^ TO eUTATS 



airfT 
rttnoM 



rfJnom lo anianiaed aeey 
-£- . anoiJibbs lo 
•;P, IjbJoT 

.anoi.Js'i£q88 lo 

4"V to aeolo aeexolqrae lo 



I—-——. I . rttnora gnxiub enoiJotnoiq lo 

netfaJ evjsel ifiimms lo Jni/ooLB 8u£3«=ij 

» . nSjfjBJ 9VJ39I tfOI8 10 JnJJOOLB 8^£S813 

.' '-■' Cflq Juorttiw 9V£.: 







157 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



TRAVEL REPORT 



Y2L£0k73TO15 



National Park for the Month of 



XTGB&r 1929 



This 
Month 



This 
Travel 

Year 
To Date 



This 
Month 
Last 
Year 



Last 
Travel 

Year 
To Date 



Increase for 
Travel Yfar 



Number Percent 



(KIVATE TRANSPORTATION: 

ars first entry 

ars reentry 

otorcycles 

Total motor vehicles 



768 

124 

— 0^ 



768 
124 
—0- 



592 

36 

— 3- 



592 

36 



1* 



-* 



30 

23 



^r 



^g — 631 — 631- - gfri 



>rscns entering via motor 
vehicles 



2713 2719, I74O 



I74O 



979 






56 



'ersons entering via other 
private transportation ... 



Total persons entering via 
private transportation ... 

>THER TRANSPORTATION: 



1T4B 1740 jf»= 



=*= 



ersons entering via stages . 

'ersons entering via trains . 

'e .-cms entering otherwise ... 

1 Total ether transportation. 

<\ND TOTAL ALL VISITORS ... 



*7*fr 271^ ^fffr """TffiT 




>mobilea in public camps during month 
;ers in public camps during month 



HOmBTHI 3HT 30 TH3MT?IAq3a 
33IVH32 KflAS JAUOITAU 



TAOS3H J3VAHT 



' 



lo rl^noM eci) 10I tii£>1 L&noitBK 



iol easeionl 

9VBlT 



J-nec 



IsvfliT 

1B9Y 

a^jsQ oT 



axriT axrfT 

rfJnoM IsvbiT 

jaj 3Y 

1B8Y 9jBd OT 



axrfT 
rf-JnoM 



05 






*** 



z 



58 



*- 1 



W 



ion I 



sec 



a* 



w 



«^r 



:WOITATHOiaKAH' 

o a — 

y ._...__^ J|^— ^1^„ . 39lOXrf9V ioJom iBvto' 

"ioJcwi bxv 3nxT9^u9 s 

n , „_- 89l0irf8' 

isrfJo bxv sniT9Jri9 ano8 
aoiJfiJToqanBT^ aii. 

fiiv aniT9Jri9 anoaieq isio 
p jrt^ . f>r?^ - nox;tB;t"toqenBi.t 8Jbv: 

iWOlTATflCHS: 

a9gBJa biv §niT9Jn9 b 

aniBiJ bxv §nxi9Jn 

.... 9aiwT9riJo §r. . 

__ ..noiofB^ToqanBiJ leriJ 

=-_-,_ aflOT.iaiv jja jai 








TgcfniuH 




axrfT 

TB9Y 



rfJnom gnxiub 8qraBo oxlcfjj . 
rfjnom gnxiub 8qmB0 o 



)- L6J 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 



rELLCK&TQlB 



NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
ORT OF TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH BUSINESS 
Na1 ' Pari for bh* Mo th of 



0CT0B3R 1929 



This 
This I Month | Increa Per'. 

th [Last Year) , . 



)CAL business 

lies of circuit maintained - 
>. of telep 11 u :oi : cod , 
). of measured service calls 
) of othe] .1 calls 
ki L No • of local calls . 
>ak load in calls p:~. r day. 



528 
162 



7581 
330 



498 
151 



7201 

468 



30 
11 



380 

-88 



6 
7 



-1? 



jceipts from measured service calls. 
jceipts from coin boxes - • • 
jceipts from telephone rental , , 



TOTAL T ?- 



>NG DISTANCE BUSINESS 

). Outbound calls. 
|. Inbound calls 



TOTAL LONG DISTANCE CALLS 



132 
103 



56 



lak load in oa 1 ' s per day 

iceipts from Long Distance business 

SLEGRAPH BUSINESS 



24 
$125.70 



12 

142.20 



12 
.16.50 



100 
11 



sssage3 via Western Union 

issages via 

TOTAL MESSAGES 



fceipts froir telegraph busim 
; . nf money tran ssages 
1. of money tran: receipts. 



fAL RECEIPTS TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH DSPT- 






23TAT2 Q3TIMU Sdi 

HKA* JAUOITAH 









3 o?; 3f 



- 


















LO-163 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 







•ELECTRICITY GENERATED, SOLD, USED, ETC. 

National Park for the Month of - •OQ^og-ssR ioga 



This This Last 

This J Travel | Month Travel 

Month J Year Last Year 

| To Date | Year To Date 



Increase for 
Travel Year 



Number Percent 



urrent generated, . . 
old to park operators, 
old to others, . . . 



53920.0 29O280,0 587IO.O 31425O.O -23970.0 ft 

1666.3 61738.3 3449*3 88264.5 -26526.2 -30 



urni3hed to other Governmental 
agencies, 

sed by National Park Service, 
lost in transit, etc., . . . -^82^^-22^541. 7 55260^7- 2£^8^^ *&&r&-~~~ **- 



Total current generated, . . 



^ 3i42 50.fr = 359 7 ^ 3 - "Wfr 



mount receivable from the sale of electricity, 



83*32 



Indicated by K. W. H. 



a3TAT8 Q3TMU 

9\Q\ft3T\Al 3HT lO TMBMTHAqaa 

3DIVR3a XHAS JAUOITAH 

,aaau .<i3tah3H3o YTioiflToaja* 



10l 88£9T0nI J8£j ?irfT 8XffT 

isey revaiT ' | levBiT rfJnoM | levaiT | airfT 

1&&Y Se&J "I.B9Y I rttnoM 



Jneoiel lecfmuH e-tsCI oT iseY je^jsQ oTJ 



V *; - ■■• SOes O.O^e .fietoenea JneTH 

©&. , - . * LW , ' • ■ .aiocr^aqo ft** OCT fcjc 

,8T9ff«tO Oi Mc 



ljsJn9£nm9voD T9rfJo oJ JbdriBirnjj 
r 88ion9§6 



,90ivT93 jItbI IfinoiJfiH yd be* 
-frr -Sr^ee^ e »e 8e C^ T »0 *8 « Y , l M 8 fifi y^Gg ,.oJe t «erw-rt ni Jeol 

. CO gg frlg O *0iy8g 0i0 8 fflDfS O . O^g • • «&eJfiiene 8 tumno IbJoT 



.Y'tioiTJ'OQlQ "io 9lB8 9rf^ men'} 9ldJ3vi909"i Jm/oa 



.H .W .2 tqS bQj£Qibnl 



-158 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



STATUS OF AUTHORIZED PROJECTS 
.^. I ?^. a - *? National Park for the Month of .... 



OCTOBER ...1929 





Percent 


Percent Percent j 


Probable 


Description of Projects 


| Constructed 


Const ru.ci.ed j Construe b< 


Date of 




To Date 


This Month j Last Month \ 


Completion 



#est Gallatin - Grayling Creek Section 99$ completed 

East Entrance lew contract 10$ completed 

Old contract 95$ completed 

Madison Junction museum and snoeshoe cabin COMPLETED 

Museum at Norris 25$ completed 

Road camp buildings at Lake 

Mess house •• 85$ completed 

Bunkhouse • • • 90$ completed 

Stable .......... 100$ completed 



eaTATa aaTiuu 

HOIfliiTJ/11 BHF ^O TM3MT«AS3a 

30»V«3a HAAS JAUOITAH 

diofl^ aasiaoHTUA 10 3 u t a t a 

lo xttnoM erfJ to! jfifil iBnoiJaH *fi5 



i QftoO j 'oe^o-il "to nox^qiiOB9Q 
3iriT j 9j*a oT j 



moliv*& ^MOyK^ - alalia!) »»** 



, : 

. . eaxrarfsauft 



)-I60 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF [HE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



REPORT OF PARK REVENUES 
X1SLLQ82S2U1LS National Park for the Month of <KE?QBaft 1929 



This Last 
Year Year 



rk revenue on hand beginning of month 0.00 



iceived 

Total 

mitted 



4206*34 
4206.34 

4206.34 



. hand close of month <fa OO 



rk revenues received this year to date 170.203 tt 



rk revenues received last year to date 

Increase 

Percent of increase 






1- 



83TATa 03TIHU 

5ROm3THI 3HT 10 TMSMTKA^BQ 

3DIVH36 XHA^ JAMOITAH 

aauHava.H.. xha5 10 x a o q a a 



J-asJ eirfT 

1J39Y 1B9Y 



■ ■-•«. -= f ■■■■:■■ 



OC, riJnooi lo sninnia9cf brusrf no 8wn9Vei 3fij 

. t .- • .. ,....,..,.... beviec 

iBvtoT 

tr.^»e». . bgtfj'im 

■ 

. . .rijTlOffl 10 980l0 Jbr- 



ei&b o$ i&ey. airfJ bdviaoai aewri9V9i rfi, 

3$&b OJ" 1J39\; J8£l D9VI9091 89JJfI9V91 tfT 

8e£9ionI 

8es9Toni 1o -tngo^S 



DE?ARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

National Park Service 
Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 



Navemter 1, 1929 




CABIN ETI ;USTTE 

To assist in keeping all cabins clean and orderly, 
the following rules must be observed: 

1. Bedding . Before you leave* this cabin, be sure that 

all bedding is neatly folded snd hung in it's 
proper place . 

2. Water Pails . All water pails, frying pans, pots 

and vessels used should be emptied, thoroughly 
cleaned and turned upside down, and all food 
should be returned to the cupboard before 
leaving. 

3. Tables . Turn table on side. Upon returning to 

cabin it will have clean t©p„ 

4. Kindling . Do not leave this cabin until you have 

provided kindling, shavings and wood for the 
next man . 

5. Pont s . Do not leave this cabin until you have 

swept it; closed the shutters; pulled the 
switch on the telephone; and complied with 
the above rules. 

Take pride in leaving the cabin neat and in 
order. It means only a few v.iinutes acre. 

Be a good ranger. Leave this cabin in better 
condition than you found it. 



George P, Baggley 
Chief Ranger 



DE?iJlffl.ISNT OF r HI3 INTJRICR 

National Pi.rlc Service 
Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Pari:, '.-/yoming 



November 1, 1929 



TO ALL RANGERS: 



Effective immediately the following changes 
in the w inter duty assignments for park rangers in 
Yellowstone National Park are to Toe noted. 

Assistant Chief Ranger Harry Trischman will be 
in charge of the northern supervisory territory, 
with headquarters at Mammoth. 

Park Ranger John S, McLaughlin is promoted to 
Assistant Chief Ranger vice Julius L. Greer. He 
will be in charge of the southern supervisory ter- 
ritory, with headquarters at Lake. 

Park Ranger Francis D, La Noue is promoted to 
Park Ranger, Grade 9, vice Jolm 3. iicLaughliii. 



George F. Eaggley 
CMef Ranger 



Department cf the Interior 
National Park Service 

Yellowstone national Parle 
Yellowstone Park, Wyo. 



October 10, 1929 



T^ ALL RANGERS; 



We are herewith sending you a copy of the general information circulars 
from other parks. These information circulars are for your information. 
They may be found very interesting reading during the winter months and the 
information gained therefrom will be very valuable. 

V/e are also sending jrou a copy of the 1929 seasonal travel report from 
Yellowstone National Park. This should be studied very carefully as it is 
the barometer of travel through the western United States. Nearly a thou- 
sand copies of this travel report have been mailed to interested people all 
over the United States. 

V/e are submitting a list of magazines that will be good reading during 
the winter. Beside this list of magazines, the Chief Ranger's office has 
an assortment cf 75 or 80 bocks of various fcinds which will be issued to 
any ranger on request. The Park Naturalist also has an assortment of about 
10,000 books cf all kinds which may be checked cut and returned. 

List of Magazines which are considered good reading material ; 



American 

Cosmopolitan 

Red Book 

Review cf Reviews 

American Mercury 

Nation's Business 

Time 

Saturday Evening Post 



Pathfinder 
Forest Life 
National Sportsman 
Outdoor American 
Literary Digest 
Reader's Guide 
Field and Stream 



National Geographic 
Liberty 
Vanity Fair 
Outlook 
Atlantic 
Scribner's 
Collier's 
Country Gentleman 



The Ranger Naturalists Manual for each year should be in every station 
for reference during the winter. The 1929 Ranger Naturalists Manual is 
complete and available on request at the office of the Park Naturalist , also 
previously published manuals net now at the stations. 

All rangers may greatly improve their time by proper reading during the 
winter. The books as suggested above should be secured before the winter 
season sets in. 



George F. Baggley 
Chief Ranger. 



I 



* 



Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 
Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, 9^0* 



}RT OF COYf TS HUNTING ACTIVITIES AND V/ILD LIFE OBSERVATIONS: 



19; 



Dates of : 


WILD LIFE OBSERVED : : 


various : DISTRICTS COVERED : 
Trips : 


: : : Ante-: : COYOTES: COYOTES 
Elk : Deer: Shew: lope : lioose: SEEN :DESIRCYSD 




: : : : : 


: : 


: : : : : : 




: : > : : : : 




• • • * » • 

• • • • • • 




• • • • • • 




• • • • • • 

• • • • • * 




• • • ♦ • • 

• * • • • • 




: : : : : : 




: : : : : : 




: : : : : : 




9 • • • • • 




: : : : : : 




: : : : : : 



REMARKS 



SIGNED. 



Pormi.tee 



> I 



Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 
Yellowstone National Park 
Ye 1 1 ows t one Park, \7yo * 



193 



PERMIT TO HUNT AND KILL CCYCTES . 

The bearer, , an employee of the 

National Park Service, is hereby authorized to hunt and kill coyotes 
in Yellowstone National Park from date tc the close of April 1930 
at which time he will deliver his gun to the Chief Ranger for seal- 
ing as required by the regulations governing the keeping of fire 
arms in this park. 

This Permit is subject to the following conditions ; 

The Chief Ranger's Office must be notified by phone, in advance 
of all hunting trips, giving dates, approximate time of day, and areas 
proposed to be hunted. 

A formal report must be submitted to the Chief Ranger's Office 
at the close of each month giving a detailed account of all hunting 
trips during the month and other information desired on a blank form 
that will be provided for the purpose. 

All pelts must be delivered to the Chief Ranger for grading and 
division on a fifty-fifty basis between the Government and the hunter, 

Trapping will be permitted only by special arrangement with the 
Chief Ranger who will specify the locations where the traps may be 
set and require that they be inspected at intervals of 24 hours. 



M.. F. Daum 

Act ing Super int endent 

Permit Nc. 



> > 



Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 
Yellowstone National Park 
Yellowstone Park, Wyoming. 



October 9, 1929 
OFFICE ORDER NO. 2 : 

The following regulations will govern predatory 
animal control work in Yellowstone National Park dur- 
ing the winter of 1929 and 1930. 

Hunting predatory animals is a part of the ranger's 
duty and rangers should try to keep predatory animals 
down to a minimum so as to minimize the losses of deer, 
antelope, and other game. 

All rangers will furnish their own guns, amunition, 
and other equipment necessary for predatory animal hunt- 
ing, and they will deliver to the Chief Ranger all pelts 
for grading and division on a fifty - fifty basis between 
the individual ranger and the Park Service. 

Each ranger may sell or otherwise dispose of his 
share of pelts as he wishes, though if the rangers wish 
to group their pelts for a lot sale, the Park Service 
will assist them in securing the best possible price 
obtainable. 

Traps may be used only in places where they may be 
inspected at least every 24 hours-. 

Concerning the disposal of elk teeth. In event 
that rangers find elk skeletons or carcasses with the 
tusks still in the head, the tusks should be removed 
and sent to the Chief Ranger's office with a report 
about the dead animal. 

The Superintendent .may, at his discretion, change 
or revise the above regulations. 

GEORGE P. BAGGLEY 
Chief Ranger. 



CO 

6 t=a 

r~ .. i 

I No. 1030— Met'L 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, WEATHER BUREAU. 

I S £ I 2 ^ 

MONTHLY METEOROLOGICAL SUMMARY. 



o 



ation, _„ J -SSL 



0*7 



.•_—., month, October ^ ^p29 



Temperature. 

(Degrees Fahrenheit.) 



Max. 



65 
...66. 

63. 
...65. 

..A 

...6.4.. 
-60_ 
...54. 
.51. 

..56. 
.61-. 

lift. 

...64.. 

-66.. 

...6.7.. 

157 

...sa... 

...57... 
...58... 

J8L 

J5L 

...61. 

.JA.. 
...63. 

52 



JKL 

20 



3.1 
32 



Min. 



.3.1.. 
...35. 

JSL 

..it.. 

„4ft- 

JML 
JUL 
._■_. 
JR.. 

...29... 
...2.4. 
...3.0... 
.31... 
33.. 
...30... 
.32... 

...38... 



Mean. 



£9. 



55,5 



.44. 

JML 
.22. 

JBL 

.20. 

.2a. 

32. 
30 

.2.5. 

M. 

.19.. 
23 



49*8 



48. 

50. 
.50. 
51. 
.54 
.5.0.. 
4 4 
44. 
.44. 
.38 

.40. 

.44.. 
.48. 

.44. 
.41. 
J4 

.48. 
.44. 



Precipita- 
tion. 

(In inches 

and 

hundredths.) 



...f ..„. 

.ft. .... 

_t 

.... Q— 
4 

...Q..... 

■4 

...4&- 
.06... 
.02... 

,.Q 

...P. 
...0 

..Q... 





Character 
of day. 



.42.. 

.35. 
34. 

.40.. 

.41- 

.48.. 

m 

14. 
.14. 
.2,9. 



...j 

,Qi. 
...ft... 

...Q... 

...Q.... 
....Q.... 
...P.... 
4 
. Q ... 
...XL... 
...0.... 
.•61. 
...T..... 
...£.... 

♦44 



Cloudy. 

Clear.. 

Qlear... 
Cloudy. 

Cloudy. 
.Cloudy. 
Cloudy; 
P-tciax 
.Clear... 

Piflldy.. 
clear.... 
v.le.ar... 
^.l.e.ar... 

8lft££ 

.Ol.Q.udy.. 
Cloudy. 
Clear- 
Cloudy. 
?±Cldy. 
Clear... 
Clear... 
Clear... 
CLaudy. 

EMOir 

Cloudy. 

aioudy. 
ilmidy.. 
P-tflldy. 
[lDiidy.. 



Total. 

.2...6.JU2.7... 



: Sun- 
shins 
Pot 



6.2 

.....85 
97 

..1.0.0. 

._.. 4_a. 

ML 

.....4.2. 

.11 

.....17. 
It 

..1Q.0. 



no 



..100 

..10.0 

...IPO. 

_JML 
.....5.Q. 

.-42- 
-1D.Q. 
....57... 

...Jft. 
.1.00. 
.1.0.0. 
.1.0.0.. 

--44^ 
.„J4 

...25 

-.0 

....35. 

-.60. 

.41. 

.....68. 



ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE. 



(Reduced to sea level; inches and hundredths.) 

Mean-—? — — «1 — highest — — O.A.7.— , date .— — 

lowest — — — t— — — , date 2.7. 



TEMPERATURE. 

Highest — HE...... date 1— ; lowest .———._ , date .... .23— 

Greatest daily range .— k , date — -— S— 



Least daily range — , date 



28 



1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 



81... 
82 — 
83... 

84... 

85 — 

86 — 



MEAN FOEJH1S MONTJHJN— _ - , „ 

..51... oi JBL... li -3_e_— 2i .4.5..... 



91 



. 92 .— — — 02 ,44— 12 33..... 22 .44— 
. 93 — — »._ . 03 -.45.... 13 .3.6.... 23 44— 
. 94 _— — — 04 .44— 14 .42— 24 .40—. 
. 95 -.4.3.— 05 ..34... 15 .44— 25 .33.— 
. 96 ..— R— OG .A—— 16 .——... 26 -42..... 

1877 87 ...41— 97 ..41— 07 ..45.... 17 .3.9— 27 .43.— 

1878 88 -—3— 98 ..3.6— 08 -JS 8— 18 .44-— 28 .40— 

1879 89 ...45- 99 ..SKI... 09 ..42..- 19 .3.Q.... 29 .4£— 

1880 90.——— 00--4_.._ 10 -.44.— 20.3.8— 30 

Normal for this month — 1— .il 

Absolute maximum for this month for 43 years J32 

Absolute minimum for this month for 42. years . _— JSQ. 

Average daily excess ( + ) or deficiency ( — ) of this month as compared 

with the normal — ...*.§.fe 

Accumulated excess ( + ) or deficiency ( — ) since January 1 ..r»j6H~ 
Average daily excess ( + ) or deficiency ( — ) since January 1 _ — i2»-Li— 

PRECIPITATION. 

Total this month .l*-27 ; snowfall— .1-..?. HOriial 7. 

Greatest precipitation in 24 hours .Q-.. 61 , date .27- 

Snow on the ground at end of month .Q.«-l 

TOTAL PRECJPITATLDN THJS MONTH IN— _ _ „ _ ^ 

1871 si 9LL..44. oiQ*.92.. iLJL7- 20..5&- 

1872 82 92Q-.-Z9- 0*L2Q.. 1&.-85- 20^34- 

1873 83 9&U34. o£*J5Q_. laUfia.. 21^44- 

1874 84 94Q-..89.- o£*J&7„. l|^-35- 2£^43- 

1875 85 95Q-..44u 05U-42-- i£^34- 2g,46^- 

1876 86 96Q..-Q6- oqUG2~ 1&.-4-7— 21^42- 

1877. 87— 97l».7.2~ o£U54~ 1&.-97- 21,53- 

1878 88 9S2..-25.- 0cS*O-Q- ia,-2-7- 21^5-7- 

1879 89l«.Sa. 992...QE- ogQ^M- l£^-69- 2l,^7- 

1880 goi^sa. ooi^iia. icU49- 2iu-8a- 30 

Normal for this month 1»4Q 

Excess ( + ) or deficiency ( — ) of this month as compared with the nor- 

mal.....r.Q.^l5.-. 

Accumulated excess ( + ) or deficiency ( — ) since January 1 ..— &*.sJ./- 

MEAN RELATIVE HUMIDITY (Percentage). 

..A— a. m., --££..ftIOQT]. p. m.,42 ; ... 4— P- m., -4d- 

WIND. 

Prevailing direction 3m. ; total movement ..46-63- — miles: 

average hourly velocity u-»-3 ; maximum velocity (for five 

minutes) — 30. — miles per hour, from £1W- - 

on Z7 

WEATHER. 

Number of days, clear 2.1 ; partly cloudy "—-; cloudy - 13— 

on which .01 inch, or more, of precipitation occurred " 

MISCELLANEOUS PHENOMENA (dates of). 

Auroras -0. ; halos: solar 0. , lunar 0- • 

Hail 0. ; 8 l e et .Q ; fog. 0- 

Thunderstorms OtJX — 

*Frost: light-—--— — ; heavy -«i ; killing <m. 



Note. — «'T" indicates trace of precipitation, 
-he autumn frosts are not recorded after the occurrence of "killing," except in Florida and along the immediate coast of the Gulf of Mexico. 



tWO ooTCuNmiMt nuimno vnu-m 



JHeiL. Jefferson , -lie-teoxologlst-. 

Weather Bureau.